Millions of small businesses have been awaiting further guidance on the Family First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”), which applies to private businesses with fewer than 500 employees. On April 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor published its temporary rule issuing regulations pursuant to the FFCRA.  This article will discuss the U.S. Department of Labor’s

On April 1, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor Wage and Hour Division posted a temporary rule issuing regulations pursuant to the Family First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA). The regulations outline, among other issues, notice and documentation requirements that an employee must provide to his or her employer in order to receive benefits from the

This is the first of several articles in which Larkin Hoffman attorneys will be discussing various topics covered in the Temporary Rule.

On April 1, 2020 the Department of Labor (“DOL”) implemented and published a 124-page rule covering all aspects of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”). According to the Small Business Reports, there

The Coronavirus Aid Relief and Economic Security Act (the “CARES Act”) provides important public funding to small businesses. The following are some of the highlights of the Paycheck Protection Program (the “Program”) which is part of the CARES Act. This Program is an expansion of the Small Business Administration (“SBA”) 7(a) loan program. The available

The U.S. Department of Labor (“DOL”) has published the model notice which employers must post as required by the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”).  The notice must be posted in conspicuous places on the premises of the employer where notices to employees are customarily posted.   An employer can satisfy this requirement by emailing or

On March 26, 2020,  the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) published its first guidance on the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA” or “Act”). The publications included a fact sheet for employees, a fact sheet for employers and a question and answers document. The documents begin to address the numerous questions that businesses have concerning

Woman working from home

This article is co-written by:
Phyllis Karasov, Larkin Hoffman
Larry Morgan, Orion HR Group, LLC

In light of the coronavirus, the majority of employers are allowing, if not mandating, that employees work from home (WFH). What should employers be thinking about when arranging for employees to telecommute?

  1. Determine which positions lend themselves to WFH. Obviously,

The COVID-19 pandemic is causing an ever-changing, difficult situation for many people. Employers are being forced to make difficult decisions affecting the lives of employees—people about whom they care deeply. As government officials attempt to respond to and mitigate the pandemic, many of you are having to dramatically cut or eliminate employee hours or even

Workers with mysterious facesYou probably think that your employees are limited to the people listed on your payroll. But under the joint-employer standard, one business’s employees can be imputed as another business’s employees for the purpose of employment laws and regulations. Earlier this week, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) announced its final rule for determining joint-employer status

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/specific-groups/guidance-business-response.htmlUpdated 3/16/2020

An employer’s response to the coronavirus pandemic can change from day-to-day, depending on guidance and recommendations issued by the CDC, state departments of health, OSHA and the World Health Organization.

The questions employers are asking are changing depending on the day, as are the answers!

Can employers question their employees about their recent

Over the past decade or so, more and more employers have purchased employment practices liability insurance (EPLI) through their agents. In general, EPLI provides employers with coverage, usually for both defense costs and damages potentially awarded in cases involving claims of discrimination or harassment by employees, overtime, and other allegedly unfair employment practices. At first