The Minnesota Supreme Court, the state’s highest court, decided to uphold the minimum wage ordinance which was enacted by the City of Minneapolis back in 2017 and which will eventually require Minneapolis employers to pay workers $15.00 per hour.  Those Minneapolis-based employers which were holding out hope that the Minneapolis ordinance would ultimately not be

The time has come for companies to begin planning their 2019 holiday parties.  While these events are a great way to show appreciation for employees and build morale, they can present certain risks for employers.  Being mindful of the following issues can help employers avoid complaints, or worse, lawsuits, associated with holiday parties.

Alcohol

While

By September 30, 2019, employers with 100 or more employees are required to submit pay data for 2017 and 2018 to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission.  This submission is known as the Component 2 EEO-1 survey, and covered employers should have received both an email notification and a letter providing their UserID which is needed

As discussed in a prior post , the National Labor Relation Board (NLRB) continues to target certain employee work rules and policies, including employee handbook provisions, as running afoul of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  Although the current NLRB has reversed several previous NLRB decisions regarding handbook policies, the line between permissible policies and

Businesses constantly search for ways to protect their competitive advantages, customer relationships, confidential business information and trade secrets.  Non-competition agreements (which often include confidentiality provisions) are usually part of those protection efforts.  Despite the belief of many employers (and employees) that these non-competition agreements are unenforceable and not worth the paper they’re written on, they

In helping employers with their written employment policies, we are often asked whether it is necessary to have a policy regarding employees’ use of cell phones for work purposes while driving.  The answer, as is often the case, is “it depends.”  If your employees drive as part of their job or commonly use their cell phones for work purposes while driving, then your company should address cell phone use while driving in a written policy.  A well-written policy can not only reduce the likelihood of accidents caused or contributed to by distracted driving, it can also help reduce your company’s liability in the event of an accident caused or contributed by your company’s employee.
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A common question asked by employers, particularly new and/or smaller companies, is whether they should create an employee handbook. Although companies are not legally required to have an employee handbook, there are several important reasons (legal and non-legal) why they should do so.

Communicate to Employees What is Expected of Them

Handbooks are useful to