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Employment, Labor and Benefits

Employers are legally required to make their workplaces “safe” for their employees and customers.  What does “safe” mean, given that no employer can guarantee a virus-free workplace?  What are the rules on screening employees, taking temperatures, and refusing to allow employees showing symptoms of COVID-19 into the workplace?  This session will talk about how to

Phyllis Karasov and Dan Ballintine discuss the matters employers need to consider when re-opening businesses after the Covid-19 shutdowns. Recalling only some employees, screening employees before they enter the workplace and dealing with employees who refuse to return to work are among the issues discussed.

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The Larkin Hoffman

Larkin Hoffman employment law specialists Phyllis Karasov and Dan Ballintine answer some of the tough questions employers face under the new Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (“FFCRA”) in our latest COVID-19 Briefing series podcast. Under the FFCRA, employers with fewer than 500 employees must provide paid leave to employees who cannot work due to pandemic-related

Over the past decade or so, more and more employers have purchased employment practices liability insurance (EPLI) through their agents. In general, EPLI provides employers with coverage, usually for both defense costs and damages potentially awarded in cases involving claims of discrimination or harassment by employees, overtime, and other allegedly unfair employment practices. At first

In the face of the ever-evolving world of social media, employers face a myriad of challenging ‎issues relating to their employees’ use of their own, personal sites, such as Facebook and blogs. ‎These issues include how to handle employees who post information about the employer, how to ‎deal with employees who use sites to harass

For several years, employers have been uncertain whether discrimination based upon sexual orientation is illegal under federal law.  Although many states, including Minnesota, have enacted laws prohibiting such discrimination by employers located within their jurisdiction, many have not, leaving federal law as the only source for potential protection in such states. In three cases argued

On August 8, the Minneapolis City Council passed an ordinance requiring employers to provide new notices to employees effective January 1, 2020. The ordinance will apply not only to employers with brick and mortar locations within the City’s limits, but also employers outside the City with employees who work at least 80 hours each year

Employers use numerous tools to screen applicants and determine which one may be the best for the job including job applications, interviews, reference checks and criminal background checks. Criminal background checks can be highly useful for employers, and can legitimately weed out applicants who are not suitable for the position. Nevertheless, the Equal Employment Opportunity

Earlier this month, we issued an article entitled, “Minnesota Enacts New Wage Theft Laws and Employee Notice Requirements.” Please click here to read the article. This article detailed sweeping new laws regarding wage theft, and requirements that employers provide employees detailed information regarding their employment at the commencement of their employment, as well as at