Change in the political party of an administration can be expected to impact the development and interpretation of federal law and regulation.  This is particularly true in the transition between former President Trump’s administration and that of President Joseph R. Biden.

President Biden has only been the President for two weeks, yet he has already

The City of Minneapolis determined that many freelance workers (independent contractors) need legal and economic protections since they are not covered by employment laws.  The City, therefore, enacted the Minneapolis Freelance Worker Protections Ordinance (the “Ordinance”).  This Ordinance, effective January 1, 2021, requires companies to enter into written agreements with most freelance workers.

The Ordinance

After much hand wringing, negotiation and name-calling, Congress has passed its second COVID-19 stimulus package, which was signed by President Trump on Sunday, December 27, 2020. For months, clients have been asking whether the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”) will be renewed or whether it will expire on December 31. We now have the

On August 14, we wrote a blog post that discussed the impact of a New York court case which invalidated several features of the Final Rule issued by the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) to implement the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA).  At that time, it was unclear whether the court’s decision applied throughout

Effective April 1, 2020, Congress passed the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) obligating employers to provide Emergency Paid Sick Leave (EPSL) and Emergency Family Leave (EFL) to employees who are unable to work because of the pandemic.  The U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) issued a Final Rule effective April 6, 2020, expanding on the

This post is co-written by Phyllis Karasov and Mike Schechter.

On Wednesday, June 24, we wrote an article on the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry’s guidance that requires a preparedness plan for the construction industry. The guidance was confusing and placed onerous responsibilities on contractors, owners and public entities, including ensuring that plans among

OSHA has been criticized for failing to promulgate a new standard for COVID-19.  The AFL-CIO sued OSHA in U.S. federal court, requesting a court to order OSHA to publish an emergency temporary standard covering COVID-19. Last week the D.C. Court of Appeals dismissed the lawsuit and the AFL-CIO has appealed.

Meanwhile in Minnesota, the State

This post is co-written by Phyllis Karasov and Mike Schechter

In his recent Executive Order 20-74, Governor Walz’s ordered critical sector businesses to create and adopt a COVID-19 plan to make workplaces safe from the spread of the coronavirus, and his administration subsequently published guidance for specific industries that pose higher risks of transmission