Many employers are recognizing the financial strain on their employees as they begin to plan for their businesses’ future in these unprecedented times. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) contains a number of provisions that make it easier to receive unemployment insurance benefits and increases the amount of unemployment benefits which

Larkin Hoffman employment law specialist Phyllis Karasov and employee benefits specialist Mary Komornicka discuss the new employee benefit features in the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act in our latest COVID-19 Briefing series podcast. The CARES Act allows employers to make changes in its Section 401(K) and 403(b) plans to assist employees who

As the agency responsible for enforcing workplace safety, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) has issued two pronouncements concerning COVID-19 and the workplace.

COVID-19 Guidance for the Construction Workforce

On April 21, 2020, OSHA published Guidance for the Construction Workforce which consists of tips to help reduce the risk of exposure to coronavirus in

Larkin Hoffman employment law specialists Phyllis Karasov and Dan Ballintine answer some of the tough questions employers face under the new Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (“FFCRA”) in our latest COVID-19 Briefing series podcast. Under the FFCRA, employers with fewer than 500 employees must provide paid leave to employees who cannot work due to pandemic-related

Millions of small businesses have been awaiting further guidance on the Family First Coronavirus Response Act (“FFCRA”), which applies to private businesses with fewer than 500 employees. On April 6, 2020, the U.S. Department of Labor published its temporary rule issuing regulations pursuant to the FFCRA.  This article will discuss the U.S. Department of Labor’s

Workers with mysterious facesYou probably think that your employees are limited to the people listed on your payroll. But under the joint-employer standard, one business’s employees can be imputed as another business’s employees for the purpose of employment laws and regulations. Earlier this week, the National Labor Relations Board (“NLRB”) announced its final rule for determining joint-employer status

The Minnesota Supreme Court, the state’s highest court, decided to uphold the minimum wage ordinance which was enacted by the City of Minneapolis back in 2017 and which will eventually require Minneapolis employers to pay workers $15.00 per hour.  Those Minneapolis-based employers which were holding out hope that the Minneapolis ordinance would ultimately not be

In December 2018, President Trump made his third appointment to the NLRB, giving the Republicans a majority on the five-person Board. 2019 has seen a number of Board decisions in which the Board reversed or narrowed its decisions made by a Board which was controlled by Democratic appointees.

Union Election Rules
In 2014, the NLRB

Whether a business’s employees are represented by a union or not, all employers should be concerned about the pending Protecting the Right to Organize Act (“PRO Act”) being considered by Congress.  If enacted, the PRO Act will alter fundamental principles of labor law and significantly prejudice the rights of employers. Supporters of the PRO Act