This post is co-written by Phyllis Karasov and Mike Schechter.

On Wednesday, June 24, we wrote an article on the Minnesota Department of Labor and Industry’s guidance that requires a preparedness plan for the construction industry. The guidance was confusing and placed onerous responsibilities on contractors, owners and public entities, including ensuring that plans among

OSHA has been criticized for failing to promulgate a new standard for COVID-19.  The AFL-CIO sued OSHA in U.S. federal court, requesting a court to order OSHA to publish an emergency temporary standard covering COVID-19. Last week the D.C. Court of Appeals dismissed the lawsuit and the AFL-CIO has appealed.

Meanwhile in Minnesota, the State

This post is co-written by Phyllis Karasov and Mike Schechter

In his recent Executive Order 20-74, Governor Walz’s ordered critical sector businesses to create and adopt a COVID-19 plan to make workplaces safe from the spread of the coronavirus, and his administration subsequently published guidance for specific industries that pose higher risks of transmission

Employers are legally required to make their workplaces “safe” for their employees and customers.  What does “safe” mean, given that no employer can guarantee a virus-free workplace?  What are the rules on screening employees, taking temperatures, and refusing to allow employees showing symptoms of COVID-19 into the workplace?  This session will talk about how to

Many employers are recognizing the financial strain on their employees as they begin to plan for their businesses’ future in these unprecedented times. The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act (CARES Act) contains a number of provisions that make it easier to receive unemployment insurance benefits and increases the amount of unemployment benefits which

As the agency responsible for enforcing workplace safety, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (“OSHA”) has issued two pronouncements concerning COVID-19 and the workplace.

COVID-19 Guidance for the Construction Workforce

On April 21, 2020, OSHA published Guidance for the Construction Workforce which consists of tips to help reduce the risk of exposure to coronavirus in

Larkin Hoffman employment law specialists Phyllis Karasov and Dan Ballintine answer some of the tough questions employers face under the new Families First Coronavirus Relief Act (“FFCRA”) in our latest COVID-19 Briefing series podcast. Under the FFCRA, employers with fewer than 500 employees must provide paid leave to employees who cannot work due to pandemic-related