Whether a business’s employees are represented by a union or not, all employers should be concerned about the pending Protecting the Right to Organize Act (“PRO Act”) being considered by Congress.  If enacted, the PRO Act will alter fundamental principles of labor law and significantly prejudice the rights of employers. Supporters of the PRO Act

Employers have long disliked labor unions’ use of inflatable rats, large balloon cats, mock funerals and other types of dramatic protests mounted when a labor union wants to exert pressure on a company to cease doing business with the employer with whom the union has a dispute.  The National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) expressly prohibits

As discussed in a prior post , the National Labor Relation Board (NLRB) continues to target certain employee work rules and policies, including employee handbook provisions, as running afoul of the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA).  Although the current NLRB has reversed several previous NLRB decisions regarding handbook policies, the line between permissible policies and

Employee work rules and policies continue to be controversial at the National Labor Relations Board (NLRB).  Under President Obama, the NLRB determined that many common employer policies and work rules violated the National Labor Relations Act (NLRA) because they interfered with and chilled employee rights to engage in protected concerted activity.  The NLRB found these